Project Wellspring

Di Luo's Teaching Portfolio

Art of China 5a. Art for the Dead II: Han

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Questions

Answer ANY TWO of the following questions:

  1. The images on the painted banner can be roughly divided into three registers (levels) from bottom to top. What does each register represent?
  2. The hill-shaped incense burner is often believed to have embodied the Daoist ideal of immortality. Explain how this is evident.
  3. How did Chinese people understand death? Use 1 example from the key works we have learned so far to demonstrate your point.

Reading Assignment

Required

  • Thorp, pp. 136-138, 144-147

Recommended

Key Works

Coffin Panel

Lacquer

Tomb of Lady Xinzhui of Dai (Tomb 1), Mawangdui, Hunan, China

Western Han dynasty, c. 168 BCE

Hunan Museum, Changsha

Painted Banner

Banière funéraire, peinture sur soie, Chine
Silk; l. 6’8 3/4″ (2.1 m)

Tomb of Lady Xinzhui of Dai (Tomb 1), Mawangdui, Hunan, China

Western Han dynasty, c. 168 BCE

Hunan Museum, Changsha

Burial Suit

Jade plaques with gold thread; l. 6’2″ (1.88 m)

Tomb of Prince Liu Sheng (Tomb 1), Mancheng, Hebei, China

Western Han dynasty, c. 113 BCE

Hebei Provincial Museum, Shijiazhuang

Hill-shaped incense burner

Bronze with gold inlay; h. 10 1/4″ (26 cm)

Tomb of Prince Liu Sheng (Tomb 1), Mancheng, Hebei, China

Western Han dynasty, c. 113 BCE

Hebei Provincial Museum, Shijiazhuang

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This entry was posted on January 31, 2017 by in session and tagged , , , , .
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