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Di Luo's Teaching Portfolio

East Asian Architecture: From Prehistoric to the Late Imperial Period

IMG_1601

Yingxian Muta, dated 1056, the oldest surviving wooden pagoda in China (Photo by Di Luo)

Course Description

This survey course explores the rich architectural legacies of China, Japan, and Korea of the premodern period. The course materials encompass architectural sites, museum collections, archaeological excavations, pictorial representations, and literary narratives organized chronologically as well as thematically, while the examples from the three countries will be investigated together in a comparative light. We will be navigating a series of distinctive architectural spaces: imperial palaces, mausoleums, monasteries, temples, shrines, pagodas, theaters, metropolises, markets, and gardens.

In addition to regular lectures, this course will arrange for two museum visits, two lab sessions, and one workshop over the semester. The lab sessions aim to increase digital literacy by teaching the basic skills of using online databases (Artstor and others) and 3D modeling (photogrammetry and SketchUp). The workshop will provide helpful tips on how to write like an art historian.

Course Objectives

  1. Knowledge of key buildings, objects, sites, and their basic historical background.
  2. A fundamental understanding of the cultural values of particular architectural forms, materials, and practice.
  3. Ability to analyze architecture as signs embodying/conveying political ideologies and/or religious messages.
  4. Familiarity with basic digital tools for art historical inquiry, including visual databases and 3D modeling.
  5. Development in the skill of writing art historical papers.

Requirements

  • Attendance and participation, 10%
  • Field report 1 (2 pages), 5%
  • Field report 2 (2 pages), 5%
  • Analytic paper 1 (5 pages), 15%
  • Analytic paper 2 (5 pages), 15%
  • Midterm exam, 20%
  • Final exam, 30%

Textbooks

Required:

  1. Course Reader (CR, available online)
  2. Fu Xinian et al. 2002. Chinese Architecture. Edited by Nancy Steinhardt. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  3. Paine, Robert and Alexander Soper. 1981. The Art and Architecture of Japan. Penguin.

Supplementary (pertinent portions of these texts will be included in the Course Reader):

  1. Ching, Francis D.K., Mark M. Jarzombek, and Vikramaditya Prakash. 2011. A Global History of Architecture. John Wiley & Sons.
  2. Lee, Sherman E. 1994. A History of Far Eastern Art. 5th ed. Prentice Hall.
  3. Thorp, Robert L., and Richard Ellis Vinograd. 2006. Chinese Art and Culture. Pearson.
  4. Sullivan, Michael. 2008. The Arts of China. 5th ed. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
  5. Mason, Penelope E. 2005. History of Japanese Art. Prentice Hall.
  6. Portal, Jane. 2000. Korea: Art and Archaeology. Thames and Hudson.
  7. Anne D’Alleva. 2012. Methods and Theories of Art History. 2nd ed. Laurence King Publishing.

Schedule

 SESSION # TOPICS & READINGS KEY DATES
1 Introduction
2 Humble Beginnings: Pit-dwellings, Huts, Stilted houses

  • Fu, Ch. 1, “The Origins of Chinese Architecture” (11-32)
  • Thorp, “Village Societies” (27-32) (CR)
  • Paine, Ch. 17, “Architecture of the Pre-Buddhist Age”
  • Ching, 8-10 (CR)
3 Early Cities, Palaces, and Ritual Buildings I: 4000-200 BCE

  • Thorp, “The Early State and Society” (55-59), “Zhou Urbanism” (91-95), “The Imperial State and Society” (119-27) (CR)
  • Sullivan, “Zhou Cities” (35-38) (CR)
  • Sarah Nelson, The Archaeology of Korea, 138-54 (CR)
4 Early Cities, Palaces, and Ritual Buildings II: 200 BCE-200 CE

  • Fu, Ch. 2, “The Qin and Han Dynasties” (33-60)
  • Thorp, “The Imperial State and Society” (119-27) (CR)
  • Ching, 58-59, 93-95, 148-49, 219-21 (CR)
5 The Underworld: First Emperor’s Mausoleum

  • Thorp, “The Tomb of the First Emperor” (139-42) (CR)
  • Sullivan, 70-83 (CR)
  • Lothar Ledderose, Ten Thousand Things, Ch. 3, “A Magic Army for the Emperor” (CR)
  • Ching, 150, 183-85 (CR)
  • Qinghua Guo, The Mingqi Pottery Buildings of Han Dynasty China, 15-85 (CR)
6 MUSEUM VISIT I: Architecture as grave goods
7 Rock-cut Architecture: Buddhist Caves along the Silk Road

  • Fu, Ch. 3, “The Three Kingdoms, Western and Eastern Jin, and Northern and Southern Dynasties” (61-90)
  • Thorp, “The Dharma Comes to the Middle Kingdom” (160-72) (CR)
  • Sullivan, 110-125 (CR)
  • Ching, 238-41 (CR)
Field report 1 due
8 LAB SESSION I: Visual Databases
9 WORKSHOP: Writing like an art historian

  • D’Alleva, Ch. 2, “The analysis of form, symbol, and sign” (16-45); Ch. 3, “Art’s contexts” (46-87) (CR)
10 The Imperial Grandeur I: Sui and Tang Metropolises

  • Fu, Ch. 4, “The Sui, Tang, and Five Dynasties” (91-134)
  • Thorp, “A New Capital: Daxing cheng and Chang’an” (186-90) (CR)
  • Sullivan, 135-37 (CR)
11 The Imperial Grandeur II: Heian Japan

  • Mason, “Heian and the Imperial Palace” (103-08) (CR)
  • Ching, 284-85, 296-97 (CR)
Analytic paper 1 due
12 Shinto Architecture

  • Paine, Ch. 21, “Shinto Architecture from Nara to Kamakura”
  • Ching, 287-89, 356-57, 399 (CR)
  • Mason, “Shinto Architecture” (53-56) (CR)
13 Buddhist Architecture I: China

  • Fu, Ch. 5, “The Liao, Song, Xi Xia, and Jin Dynasties” (135-98)
  • Thorp, “State Patronage of the Dharma” (195-209),  “Buddhist Artistic Culture” (268) (CR)
14 Buddhist Architecture II: Japan

  • Paine, Ch. 18, “Buddhist Architecture of the Asuka and Nara Periods,” Ch. 20, “Buddhist Architecture of the Heian Period,” Ch. 22, “Buddhist Architecture of the Kamakura Period”
  • Mason, 57-69, “Buddhist Arts” (124, 132-33, 141-45, 149-56) (CR)
15 Midterm Review
16 Midterm Exam
17 Buddhist Architecture III: Korea

  • Ching, 290-92, 298-300, 361, 398 (CR)
18 Building Techniques of Wooden Structures

  • Ledderose, Ten Thousand Things, Ch. 5, “Building Blocks, Brackets, and Beams” (CR)
  • Sullivan, 167-68 (CR)
  • Ching, 286, 358-60, 400-01 (CR)
19 Architecture Illustrated

  • Peter Golas, Picturing Technology in China, 37-42, 59-72 (CR)
  • Anita Chung, Drawing Boundaries, Ch. 1, “The Jiehua Tradition” (CR)
20 MUSEUM VISIT II: Paintings of architecture
21 Architecture in Miniature

  • Di Luo, “The ‘Heavenly Palace’ in Miniature” (CR)
Field report 2 due
22 LAB SESSION II: 3D modeling
23 Gardens and Landscapes

  • Fu, Ch. 6, “The Yuan and Ming Dynasties” (199-260)
  • Thorp, “Official Patronage of Religious Art and Architecture” (290-97) (CR)
  • Sullivan, 209-11 (CR)
24 Domestic Space I: China

  • Thorp, “Residential Architecture” (336-37) (CR)
  • Ching, 439-45, 486-94, 495-501 (CR)
  • Mason, 238-43, 305-07 (CR)
25 Domestic Space II: Japan

  • Paine, Ch. 19, “Secular Architecture of the Asuka, Nara, and Heian Periods,” Ch. 23, “Domestic Architecture of the Kamakura Period,” Ch. 24, “Secular Architecture of Muromachi, Momoyama, and Edo”
Analytic paper 2 due
26 Embracing the Modern I: Local Traditions

  • Thorp, “Palace Architecture” (350-52) (CR)
  • Sullivan, 259-61 (CR)
  • Ching, 587-92, 600-604 (CR)
27 Embracing the Modern II: Foreign Influences

  • Fu, Ch. 7, “The Qing Dynasty” (261-344)
  • Thorp, “European Arts and Artists at the Qing Court” (360-62) (CR)
  • Mason, 346-50 (CR)
28 The Architectural Legacy of East Asia

  • Fu, “Introduction” (1-10)
  • Nancy Steinhardt, “Seeing China through Korea and Japan” (CR)
29 Final Review
30 Final Exam
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This entry was posted on April 7, 2016 by in syllabus and tagged , , , , , , , .
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